Jana Awjanar Majhe

Jana Awjanar Majhe is a reflection of the author’s journey of life. It depicts his retrospective feeling about his past, and he tries to bring back those golden days in the mirror of the present. Having spent most of his childhood and adolescence in Kashi, the details of old Kashi are vibrant in the book.

Probashir Golpo Shongroho

Probashir Golpo Shongroho, a collection of more than 20 short stories, is a continuation of Bimal Chakravartty’s tales that began in his debut book, Jana Awjanar Majhe. Bengali is a sweet language – almost poetic – and these tales, each with a hint of a moral – right from ‘if you love someone then don’t hide it’ to ‘destruction has a music that is its very own for it heralds the beginning of something new’; from ‘sorry is still one of the hardest words to say’ to ‘widow remarriage continues to be a taboo’ – all add the right aroma to this book. The author might not have lived in Kolkata for many years, but his tales have the Kolkata flavour – it is anything but probashi. Read this collection of very simply told tales to appreciate youthful writing, where seriousness gets effortlessly interwoven with humour, written by a quintessential Bengali. If you know the bliss of eating bhaat-daal on a Sunday afternoon, then read the book, and if you don’t know, then read it and find out.

Probashir Golpo Songroho

When suave writing is interwoven with simplicity, then we get a book like Probashir Golpo Shongroho. A collection of 21 stories from the author of the much-appreciated autobiography, Jana Awjanar Majhe, they peek into the author’s life, his thoughts, and his soul. The stories are layered beauties – how else would you explain a horror story speaking of ‘sorry is still so tough to say’ or the tale of how the author had gotten saved from many neardeath experiences talking subtly about ‘when the Lord protects us, we can defy death’. Each story is not more than three to four pages long, but the music that he plays with the words, moving from one note to another, surprising the reader with the unexpected, shows the deftness of the author’s writing skills. He might be a fan of the stalwarts of Bengali literature, but he, himself, is definitely one too.